Clint Black Biography

A country traditionalist in the very best sense of the word, Clint Black has been one of country's most popular artists since arriving on the scene in 1989 and (along with Garth Brooks and Alan Jackson, who arrived about the same time) igniting the "hat act" phenomenon.

Black was born in New Jersey on February 4, 1962, but he was raised in Houston and spent years playing nightclubs and honky-tonks in Texas before he hooked up with Clint Black manager Bill Ham and signed to RCA Records. (Ham and Black parted ways amid rancorous lawsuits in 1992.) Black's first four singles--"Better Man," "Killin' Time," "Nobody's Home," "Walkin' Away"--all hit No. 1, and the album from which they came, Killin' Time was an undisputed classic. It sold more than two million copies, as did its follow-up, Put Yourself In My Shoes. Black won the Country Music Association's Horizon Award in 1989 and was named its top male vocalist the following year. By that time, he was already headlining arena shows, and his popularity only grew when he married actress Lisa Hartman (Knot's Landing, Tabitha) and joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1991.

Clint Black

Black and his guitarist Hayden Nicholas have written almost all the material Black has recorded, and he's occasionally been criticized for not recording outside material (which is the norm in Nashville). Whatever Black has lost in sales, though, he's made up for in identity. However, his newest album, 1997's Nothin' But The Taillights, finds him writing with a number of new collaborators, including fellow artists Steve Wariner, Matraca Berg and Marty Stuart, in an effort to expand his style.

Clint Black Biography